Chutney - using gin-soaked sloes

Post recipes and methods here for jams and preserves made with sloes. This section is non-alcoholic.

Moderators: SloeHoHo, Blackthorn

Post Reply
Galloway Gal
Posts: 31
Joined: 17 Nov 2007, 00:27
Location: The Stewartry of Kirkcudbrightshire, Dumfries & Galloway, Scotland

Chutney - using gin-soaked sloes

Post by Galloway Gal » 07 Sep 2008, 14:39

After looking high and low for a recipe using previously gin-soaked sloes, and not finding one, I decided that the only thing to do was risk a minor investment in some ingredients and go for it. However, BE WARNED, only make this chutney if you have some time on your hands (or like me, are prepared to indulge your foodie proclivities), since stoning 3 pounds of gin-soaked sloes was messy and sticky - even using a proper cherry-stoner - and took over two hours - and that's before even starting on the chutney!

Anyhow, here's my adapted version of the sloe chutney recipe that seems to be doing the rounds:

Ingredients

3lbs of stoned, sloe-ginned sloes
4 medium-sized Bramley apples, peeled, cored and chopped
3 large onions, roughly chopped
1 lb sultanas
2 rounded teaspoons ceyenne pepper (I like it spicy, you could use less)
1.5 inches of fresh root ginger, grated (I keep mine in the freezer, it keeps without rotting and grates really finely)
1 heaped teaspoon garlic granules (I didn't have any fresh)
2 rounded teaspoons salt
1 rounded teaspoon ground mace
1 rounded teaspoon ground allspice
juice and grated rind of two large oranges
1lb 12 oz sugar (mine was half granulated, half soft brown)
1.5 pints of white wine vinegar (about half a pint of mine was orange flavoured - see below * )

Method

Because some of the sloes looked a bit wrinkled and tough, I decided to pre-cook them in the pressure cooker to soften them up a bit so I put half the sloes and half a pint of water in the pressure cooker and cooked them for 9 minutes once at full pressure. Then do the other half the same way. I guess you could simply pre-boil them but I think they would take some time to soften (the cranberries that I tried making into cranberry sauce after making some cranberry vodka earlier this year never did mush down, even though they tasted nice).

Once the sloes have softened, drain off any excess water (and have a slurp - it's very yummy) and chuck them in a large preserving pan with all of the other ingredients. Bring up to the boil and then simmer slowly, stirring occasionally to stop it from sticking. Cook it all up together until thick and mushy and the apples have all broken down - about 1.5 hours.

Ladle into clean, warm jars (warmed in the oven to at least 100 degrees C). Cover, label and leave in a cool place for a couple of months for the flavour to develop.

Initial wee tastes in the "just-bottled" state make me think that this is going to be a dark, fruity, spicy chutney that would go with just about anything. It's quite thick and the sultanas are much in evidence (maybe I could use fewer next time??) but I'm quietly optimistic. Will report back at Christmas time and let you know how it is eating.

(*) Orange vinegar: I always have a bottle of white wine vinegar infused with as many thin slivers of orange peel (de-pithed and cut into slivers so that I can get them in and out of the bottle) as I can fit into the bottle, on the go. It takes on a fabulous orange colour and flavour and goes really well in marinades and salad dressings and now, it seems, sloe chutney as well!

I hope my experimenting helps with the great "what can I do with my gin-soaked sloes?" debate and inspires some others to see how else they can ring the changes on this recipe.

Have fun!

Galloway Gal.

Galloway Gal
Posts: 31
Joined: 17 Nov 2007, 00:27
Location: The Stewartry of Kirkcudbrightshire, Dumfries & Galloway, Scotland

Re: Chutney - using gin-soaked sloes

Post by Galloway Gal » 07 Sep 2008, 14:51

Oooops! Sorry folks. I ought to have said that this quantity made 9 pots, of all shapes and sizes, of chutney. So I guess it yields about 10-11 one-pound jars.

Just so you know before starting....

Galloway Gal

jollygreengiant
Posts: 12
Joined: 15 Aug 2006, 11:32

Re: Chutney - using gin-soaked sloes

Post by jollygreengiant » 23 Dec 2014, 12:48

Hi, Did we ever get feedback as to how this turned out - it would be useful to know. Did anyone else try making it?

jgg

Sloecoach
Posts: 15
Joined: 07 Oct 2005, 16:11

Re: Chutney - using gin-soaked sloes

Post by Sloecoach » 21 Jan 2015, 01:58

Followed the majority of this recipe and it yielded 12 jars of delicious sloe chutney. Thank you very much for posting this, Galloway Gal :D . Yes, pitting the ginny sloes was a bit messy but with 3 people helping we soon got it done. We "tweaked" the ingredients slightly to include more apple as the mixture was a tad sloppy for our liking. We also had no mace so we improvised and ground up some juniper berries instead (this seems to work well). The only problem with this recipe is that the chutney is so moreish it's going to need some willpower to keep a few jars long for it to enough to mature fully!

Galloway Gal
Posts: 31
Joined: 17 Nov 2007, 00:27
Location: The Stewartry of Kirkcudbrightshire, Dumfries & Galloway, Scotland

Re: Chutney - using gin-soaked sloes

Post by Galloway Gal » 27 Sep 2015, 23:36

Better late than never (just a few years later!) here's the feedback I promised.

In a word - YUM!!!

My other half was so taken with the chutney that I'm still having to fend off "please make some more" pleas from him, even tho he knows that currently there aren't any sloes doing anything....a situation I may remedy later this year. As mentioned by somebody above, it did make a fairly sloppy chutney but that's how we like it, since most chutney in this house invariably finds its way into sarnies. The boozy edge was fairly apparent at the start but as the chutney mellowed, so this reduced and it all just became flavoursome and interesting.

It was dark, sweet and unctious with the sloes (maybe because of being booze-soaked??) still fairly distinct in a mixture that was otherwise a chutney-esque mix of sweet, spicy, yumminess. Yes, it is fiddly to make but, if like me, you can't bear chucking your "used" sloes out, this is worth thinking about. I don't think you'll regret it. :D

Post Reply