Don't confuse 'first frosts' with domestic freezers!

Discuss sloe gin recipes - and all those secret family variations! Post your questions and replies here if they are about sloes and gin

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Blackthorn
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Posts: 221
Joined: 14 Mar 2004, 04:47
Location: Cordoba Spain (ex Cheltenham)

Don't confuse 'first frosts' with domestic freezers!

Post by Blackthorn » 02 Sep 2006, 16:34

Don't confuse 'first frosts' with domestic freezers!

Leaving the sloes on the bush until 'after the first frosts' is in my opinion entirely about allowing full ripening, and has nothing to do with any other so-called benefits of freezing!

I prefer to pick/prick/bottle all on the same day, and then relax.

If you still want to freeze, simply search sloe.biz for others' opinions on freezing.
"There's no biz like sloe.biz"

sandy130674
Posts: 37
Joined: 12 Aug 2006, 17:59
Location: Maldon, Essex

Post by sandy130674 » 03 Sep 2006, 17:43

The full ripeness of a sloe berry is dependent on the cumulative number of growing degree days (GDD) from the pollination of the Blackthorn flower. The exceptionally warm June and July months has resulted in a high GDD figure so far this year, so that in most parts of England the sloe crop is at least two weeks ahead of schedule.

With increasing average Summer temperatures over the last 20 years, the old saying that wou must wait until the first frost to ensure full ripeness is becoming irrelevent in my opinion. First frosts have in recent years become so late that in the SE of England you'll be extremely lucky to find any left. With the climate changing, don't rely on the first frost. After all, warm days and mild nights ripen sloes, frosts do not.

Blackthorn
Site Admin
Posts: 221
Joined: 14 Mar 2004, 04:47
Location: Cordoba Spain (ex Cheltenham)

Post by Blackthorn » 03 Sep 2006, 21:16

sandy130674 wrote: ... After all, warm days and mild nights ripen sloes, frosts do not.
That's precisely my point. Don't think that by putting early unripe sloes in a freezer you will gain any shortcut to ripeness or flavour.

Harvesting later, rather than sooner, will usually ensure riper fruit. Frost itself is not important to sloes intended for your sloe gin - but by picking later rather than earlier you will definitely have riper and tastier fruit.
"There's no biz like sloe.biz"

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